Tag Archives: Ansgar

The first IEEE P7003™ Working Group meeting

IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) invites your participation in the IEEE P7003™, Standard for Algorithmic Bias Considerations Working Group.

Why get involved: 

The goal of this Standard Project is to describe specific methodologies that can help users certify how they worked in order to address and eliminate issues of negative bias in the creation of their algorithms. “Negative bias” refers to the usage of overly subjective or uniformed data sets or information known to be inconsistent with legislation concerning certain protected characteristics (such as race, gender, sexuality, etc.); or with instances of bias against groups not necessarily protected explicitly by legislation, but otherwise diminishing stakeholder or user wellbeing and for which there are good reasons to be considered inappropriate.

Who should participate:

Programmers, manufacturers, researchers or other stakeholders involved in creating an algorithm along with any stakeholders defined as end users of the algorithm, and any non-user affected by the use of the algorithm, including but not limited to customers, citizens or website visitors

How to Participate:

If you wish to participate in the IEEE P7003™ Working Group, please contact the Working Group Chair, Ansgar Koene.

Meeting Information:

The first IEEE P7003™ Working Group meeting will be held online via (WebEx) on Friday, 5 May from 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM (EST)

REGISTER FOR MEETING

If you cannot attend the meeting and want to be added to the distribution list please fill out this form.

Algorithm Workshop, University of Strathclyde. February 2017

What are algorithms and how are they designed? Why are they used in commercial practice and what kinds of benefits can they bring? What are the potential harmful impacts of using algorithms and how can they be prevented?

On Wednesday 15th February 2017 some UnBias consortium members had the pleasure of attending an Algorithm Workshop hosted by the Law School, University of Strathclyde. During the workshop, we had the opportunity to consider, discuss and begin to address key issues and concerns surrounding the contemporary prevalence of algorithms. The workshop was also attended by students from the host University and an interdisciplinary group of experts from areas including Law, Computer Science and the Social Sciences. This mix of expertise made for a really great afternoon of talks and discussions surrounding the design, development and use of algorithms through various disciplinary perspectives.

Continue reading Algorithm Workshop, University of Strathclyde. February 2017

Internet Society – European Chapters meeting

Agenda and Details

Wednesday 22 February

12:00 Lunch at the venue

Welcome and introductions, Frederic Donck

Introduction to trust, based on 2016 ISOC report (and discussion), Richard Hill

Editorial responsibility for online content – platform neutrality, recommender systems and the problem of ‘fake news’ (and discussion), Ansgar Koene

Future Internet Scenarios, Konstantinos Komaitis

17:30 Day 1 ends

19:00 Dinner (On Canal Boat leaving from Oosterdok in front of the hotel)

Thursday 23 February

9:00 Day starts

Collaborative security introduction, Olaf Kolkman

Real life examples of collaborative security in action meeting, Andrei Robachevsky

User-Trust, with regard to longevity and security of IoT devices (and discussion), Jonas Jacek

Round table on current issues related to user trust in Europe

12:30 Working lunch at the venue

Search ranking technologies (and discussion), Brandt Dainow

ISOC-NL presentation

Way forward: meeting on next steps, concrete actions for ISOC and chapters

16:00 Day 2 ends

University of Strathclyde – Algorithms Workshop

Algorithm Workshop 15 February 2017

1230 hours Coffee, tea and biscuits

INTRODUCTIONS: POLICY, LAW, TECHNOLOGY

1300 hours Introduction to algorithms and their place in governance – Michael Veale, UCL

1330 hours Law and algorithmic governance—some war stories and some solutions? – Lilian Edwards, University of Strathclyde

1410 hours Algorithms—a technical perspective—are they really a black box? – Ansgar Koene, Unbias

1440 hours Questions

1450 hours Coffee

TYPES OF ALGORITHMIC GOVERNANCE AND POSSIBLE REMEDIES

1505 hours Algorithms, media governance and political disinformation – Lorna Woods, Essex; Rachel Craufurd –Smith, Edinburgh

1535 hours Algorithmic pricing and employment discrimination – Freddie Brogesius, IViR (NL) John Gannon, Leeds

1610hours Algorithms and search engines – Thomas Hoeppner, Berlin

1630hours Questions

1640 hours Panel—Conclusions and next steps

1715 hours Dinner

Internet Society UK England – User Trust Webinar

In preparation for the European Chapters meeting (22-23 February 2017) we will have a 90 minutes Webinar / Conference call on Tuesday 14 February 2017 from 6pm to collect input from participants about the ways in which ISOC UK can/should engage with the theme of User Trust.

In June 2016 ISOC published a working paper “A policy framework for an open and trusted Internet” outlining the four interrelated dimension to be considered when developing policies for the internet. http://www.internetsociety.org/doc/policy-framework-open-and-trusted-internet

The aim of the European Chapters meeting is to build on this and identify specific areas related to User Trust that ISOC should prioritise and focus on when engaging with policy maker to build a trusted Internet.

The specific discussions around User Trust that have been proposed for the meeting are:

  • Ethical data handling
  • Privacy
  • Data breaches
  • Examples of collaborative security in action
  • Internet of Things – implications for security, privacy, control (who control which aspect of the device: user vs. service provider), liability in case of problems, longevity (e.g. devices embedded in infrastructure)
  • Digital Literacy – the need for people to understand basic aspects of how the internet, and digital services, work in order to: improve cybersecurity; be able to give informed consent to personal data usage; understand the implications of proposed legislation (e.g. snoopers charter); …
  • User generated content moderation – how to approach the issues related to fake news and editorial responsibility
  • An overview of the situation in Russia

Other areas of User Trust that might be especially relevant for ISOC UK could be:

  • Government surveillance powers (implications and legal challenges to the Investigative Powers Act)
  • The impact of nation-first, anti-globalization movement (Brexit)
  • Governance of the platform economy (e.g. Uber, Deliveroo), i.e. classification as ‘tech’ company to avoid regulations

Which areas should we prioritize? The chapters meeting is only one and a half days long so time is limited.

Looking beyond the European Chapters meeting, what kind of follow-up activities should ISOC UK pursue, e.g. digital literacy 101 for parliamentarians?

Topic: Internet Society UK and User Trust – Webinar
Time: Feb 14, 2017 6:00 PM London

Launch of 5Rights Youth Juries report at House of Lords

You are invited to join us for the launch of a groundbreaking report that articulates the voice of children and young people, and their relationship to the internet and digital technologies;

The Internet On Our Own Terms

How Children and Young People Deliberated about their Digital Rights

6 – 8pm
Tuesday 31st January 2017
Committee Room 3A
House of Lords
London, SW1A 0PW

Speakers;
Baroness Beeban Kidron, Prof. Stephen Coleman, Dr. Elvira Perez Vallejos and youth jurors, followed by a Q&A

In April 2015 young people aged between 12 and 17 gathered together in the cities of Leeds, London and Nottingham to participate in a series of jury-styled focus groups designed to ‘put the internet on trial’. In total, nine juries took place which included 108 young people, approximately 12 participants per jury.
The report outlines the ground-breaking research process, using actors to set scenarios for debate and a deliberative process to capture the changing views of young people as they examine a broad range of claims and evidence.
The policy suggestions, straight from the mouths and imaginations of the young participants, aimed at Ministers, Industry, Educators and Business are vibrant, surprising and pragmatic.
We hope you will join us to hear more

2016, an eventful year for algorithms

For algorithm based systems, as with many other topics, 2016 turned out to be an eventful year. As we close the year and look back on events, the course of 2016 brought many of the issues we intend to address in the UnBias project to the attention of people and organizations who previously perhaps had not considered these things before.

Continue reading 2016, an eventful year for algorithms