Tag Archives: Digital Rights

Presentation of “a governance framework for algorithmic accountability and transparency” at the European Parliament

On October 25th we presented our Science Technology Options Assessment (STOA) report on “a governance framework for algorithmic accountability and transparency” to the Members of the European Parliament and the European Parliament Research Services “Panel for the Future of Science and Technology.

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Age-Appropriate Design Code – call for evidence by the ICO

5Rights report: ‘Digital Childhood: Addressing Childhood Development Milestones in the Digital Environment’

As of May 25th 2018 the Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA2018) has taken effect in the UK, supporting and supplementing the implementation of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

An important requirement in the DPA2018, going beyond the GDPR, is the inclusion of an Age Appropriate Design Code (section 123 of DPA2018) to provide guidance on the design standards that the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) will expect providers of online ‘Information Society Services’ (ISS), which are likely to be accessed by children, to meet.

The ICO is responsible for drafting the Code and has issued a call for evidence is the first stage of the consultation process.

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UnBias submissions to UK Parliamentary inquiries on “Fake News” and “Algorithms in decision-making”

Prior to the June 8th snap election there were two Commons Select Committee inquiries that both touched directly on our work at UnBias and for which we submitted written evidence. One on “Algorithms in decision-making” and another on “Fake News”.

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Internet Society – European Chapters meeting

Agenda and Details

Wednesday 22 February

12:00 Lunch at the venue

Welcome and introductions, Frederic Donck

Introduction to trust, based on 2016 ISOC report (and discussion), Richard Hill

Editorial responsibility for online content – platform neutrality, recommender systems and the problem of ‘fake news’ (and discussion), Ansgar Koene

Future Internet Scenarios, Konstantinos Komaitis

17:30 Day 1 ends

19:00 Dinner (On Canal Boat leaving from Oosterdok in front of the hotel)

Thursday 23 February

9:00 Day starts

Collaborative security introduction, Olaf Kolkman

Real life examples of collaborative security in action meeting, Andrei Robachevsky

User-Trust, with regard to longevity and security of IoT devices (and discussion), Jonas Jacek

Round table on current issues related to user trust in Europe

12:30 Working lunch at the venue

Search ranking technologies (and discussion), Brandt Dainow

ISOC-NL presentation

Way forward: meeting on next steps, concrete actions for ISOC and chapters

16:00 Day 2 ends

Launch of 5Rights Youth Juries report at House of Lords

You are invited to join us for the launch of a groundbreaking report that articulates the voice of children and young people, and their relationship to the internet and digital technologies;

The Internet On Our Own Terms

How Children and Young People Deliberated about their Digital Rights

6 – 8pm
Tuesday 31st January 2017
Committee Room 3A
House of Lords
London, SW1A 0PW

Speakers;
Baroness Beeban Kidron, Prof. Stephen Coleman, Dr. Elvira Perez Vallejos and youth jurors, followed by a Q&A

In April 2015 young people aged between 12 and 17 gathered together in the cities of Leeds, London and Nottingham to participate in a series of jury-styled focus groups designed to ‘put the internet on trial’. In total, nine juries took place which included 108 young people, approximately 12 participants per jury.
The report outlines the ground-breaking research process, using actors to set scenarios for debate and a deliberative process to capture the changing views of young people as they examine a broad range of claims and evidence.
The policy suggestions, straight from the mouths and imaginations of the young participants, aimed at Ministers, Industry, Educators and Business are vibrant, surprising and pragmatic.
We hope you will join us to hear more